Log in or Register for enhanced features | Forgotten Password?
White Papers | Suppliers | Events | Report Store | Companies | Dining Club | Videos
Specialized Packaging
Food Products
Return to: PKBR Home | Specialized Packaging | Food Products

Baker Perkins launches starchless depositing technology to produce 3D jellies

PKBR Staff Writer Published 10 January 2018

Baker Perkins, a provider of manufacturing and process services to the food industry, has launched a fully automated depositor to produce three-dimensional (3D) jellies and gummies.

With a patented mould design, the depositor can deliver outputs ranging from 100kg to 1,000kg per hour.

The company has developed a starchless depositing technology to produce 3D jellies, which is not possible with traditional production systems such as starch moulding.

According to the company, starchless depositing into solid moulds is the only path to make true 3D shapes.

The technology can be used to produce 3D spherical balls, full fruit shapes such as raspberries, strawberries and pears, as well as animals and cartoon characters.

Baker Perkins has worked with ingredient suppliers to use advanced gelling agents, comprising quick setting formulations of pectin, gelatin, carrageenan and starch.

In November 2017, Baker Perkins opened a new industrial extrusion innovation center in Peterborough, UK.

The new center is designed to offer a resource for chemical, plastics, pharmaceutical, packaging and construction materials trials.

The center also offers research and development services for complete range of industrial extrusion applications, in addition to providing full powder coating production facilities.

In September same year, Baker Perkins introduced new ServoForm Mini small batch / lab-scale depositor for the functional and medicated confectionery applications.

The ServoForm Mini applications comprised of small to medium batch manufacture, new product development and production of marketing samples.

Image: Baker Perkins’ starchless depositing technology will be used to produce 3D jellies. Photo: courtesy of Baker Perkins.